Trick or Treat with UNICEF

 

 

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Every year at this time, I look forward to Trick or Treat for UNICEF. This is the only UNICEF activity that my kids can join me at. The other programs I do with UNICEF involve travel to areas that are under adverse conditions such as my last visit to Haiyan-affected areas in Tacloban. But the TOT for UNICEF is the perfect way to involve kids in raising funds and awareness about children’s issues. This campaign shows how everyone, even children themselves, can do their share to help kids in need.

 

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These are the Trick or Treat for UNICEF boxes of Sophia, Lily and Stella. During Halloween events, they are to bring these boxes with them so they can ask “treat givers” for some money to help raise funds for UNICEF Philippines.

 

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The back of the box shows how every little contribution counts and makes a big difference in children’s lives. This gives a more meaningful celebration of Halloween. Any child can join this campaign. Just go to Toy Kingdom and sign up for a box. Then after Halloween, go to the SM Payment counters listed at the back of the box and submit your donations.

 

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Since TOT for UNICEF was launched in the Philippines in 2012, my kids have been looking forward to participating.  This was when Stella was just three years old (back in 2012). She never wanted to see me go, so she came with me on stage.

 

Caption this! Haha. Stella was falling. I knocked down Lily's hat. Soph's hat also fell. This was the moment Lily's name was announced as winner of art contest. Haha!
Also from 2012, the kids and I were taking Photo Booth pictures when the winners of the art contest were announced. This was the moment Lily heard her name! Haha.

 

My two kids won first prize in the art contest in each of their age categories. Awww. #tot4unicef @unicefphils
Both Sophia and Lily won 1st place during the art contest. Each child was asked to draw a super hero and explain its powers.  Photo from 2012.

 

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The Kid Superheroes theme symbolizes Youth Empowerment. It sends a message to kids that they can be superheroes for other children in need. Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF empowers kids to help others in a fun and creative way. Photo from 2012

 

Our favourite time of year at @unicefphils. My kids all run their own fundraising campaign during Halloween. Get your Trick or Treat Collection Boxes at Toy Kingdom and have your kids get involved with this great cause. #unicef @unicef #zamboanga #dogood
The following year, in 2013, my girls participated again. Here’s Stella, still glued to me.

 

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This year, we are all out in supporting TOT for UNICEF again. The kids did the whole 9 yards – art contest, commitment board, signing up for the boxes.  Stella, now 5, was able to assemble her own box. She’s taking charge of her TOT for UNICEF box as she goes trick or treating this weekend.

 

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All three daughters — all writers and artists — loved this part of the program. You can actually still join the online art contest here.

 

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This year’s Trick-or-Treat focuses on emergency preparedness since the Philippines is one of the most high-risk countries in the world for experiencing natural disasters like typhoons, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions.

 

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UNICEF Philippines National Ambassador Gary Valenciano performed in front of a crowd during the launch of the annual UNICEF Trick or Treat Event at the SM Southmall foodstreet, October 4, 2014. Photo UNICEF/Jeric Cruz 2014

 

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Verity Rushton, UNICEF Child Protection Officer; Gary Valenciano, UNICEF Philippines National Ambassador; me, UNICEF Special Advocate for Children; Babyruth Chuaunsu, SM Supermalls AVP-Operations; Lei Sia, Toy Kingdom Area Manager pose for a photo on the UNICEF Commitment wall, October 5, 2014 at the Launch of the UNICEF Trick or Treat event at the SM Southmall foodstreet.

 

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And my darling Sophia won again — first place! (I was not involved in the judging. I don’t know who the judges were.)

 

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Sophia with Tito Gary.

 

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Lily and Stella, showing their art work. It was good for them to see the kind of work UNICEF does for kids around the world. UNICEF relies entirely on voluntary donations to fund its work for children in the Philippines and worldwide. And now kids can join in giving back.

 

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Stella’s superhero is “Super Stella” and she has the power to teach all children how to read.

 

 

For more information on TOT for UNICEF, go to www.unicef.ph or visit their Facebook page here.

 

 

Photo Diary, My UNICEF visit to Tacloban

 

 

I went on a UNICEF site visit to Tacloban a couple of weeks ago. As with every UNICEF trip I’ve taken in the past, I was extremely moved. It has been nine months since this strongest storm to ever hit landfall devastated eastern Visayas. Driving through Tacloban and parts of Palo, Leyte, you can still see many remnants of the physical damage. It’s still quite overwhelming. But in this trip, I also saw a lot of hope.

It was good to see some smiles again. But ask any individual who lived through Haiyan/Yolanda, “How are you doing?/Kamusta ka na?” and tears well up in their eyes. The wounds are deep. Any hint of rain or strong winds brings them back to that fateful day last November 8th. I didn’t want anyone to have to relive their harrowing ordeal. Almost everyone gathered to see me at my visit lost someone they loved during the storm. Instead I wanted to see what life is like presently for those who were affected.

Over 14.1 million people were affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Of those, 5.9 million were children. UNICEF continues to provide life-saving and recovery assistance for children affected by Typhoon Haiyan. There’s still a lot of work that needs to be done.

Here’s my photo diary of my visit to Tacloban and Palo,Leyte.

 

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Some of the most incredible scenes were of these huge ships that ran aground in Tacloban during Haiyan. In Barangay Anibong alone, there were five ships.

 

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This barangay in Anibong has been declared a “no dwelling zone.” But despite that, people have rebuilt their houses near the water.

 

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Like the sign says, this is still a “danger zone.”

 

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This ship went inland the furthest. It actually hit the high way.

 

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Here’s the other end of that ship that went furthest inland. When my friends saw my photos, one of them asked why these boats haven’t been pulled back into shore yet. She felt frustrated like no one was doing anything. But I have to tell you that these are huge ships. And they are so far inland. Nothing can pull these back to the water.

 

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So instead of being pulled away, some of the ships were being sliced up into pieces by the ship owners.

 

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The irony. A sticker saying “Think Safety” was plastered on this cargo container. It was one of the hundreds of containers from the port that washed ashore. It now serves as foundation for this house that’s not even supposed to be there.

 

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The barangay captain telling me about their dilemma.

 

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Rosario, the Barangay Captain in Anibong.

 

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With the Chief of Field Office Maulid Warfa at the UNICEF office in Tacloban. Some of the UNICEF staff have been on site since the typhoon struck last November 8th 2013. Whenever I visit sites with UNICEF I am not only touched by the stories of the local people but also of the professionals who have devoted their life doing humanitarian work. These are the people who respond to emergencies around the world.

 

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We went to Barayong Elementary school in Palo, Leyte. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014

 

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The acting-principal of Barayong Elementary School showing me and Cromwell Bacareza, OIC of UNICEF WASH Team some of the physical improvements in the school, like a new roof. This school was severely affected by Haiyan/Yolanda. It is located on a mountain. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014

 

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It was heartwarming to see kids back in school. To date, UNICEF has provided learning materials and supplies for over 500,000 pre-school and school-aged children (3 to 17 years) across Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda-affected areas.

 

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I loved seeing smiles back in their faces.

 

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That afternoon, the grade 4 and 5 kids were writing letters to their pen pals from Australia.

 

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This is such a great activity.

 

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Erwin Dolina, teacher-in-charge and acting-principal of Barayong Elementary School and his makeshift office.

 

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His laptop is broken so he is using a separate monitor hooked up to the laptop’s keyboard. Mr. Dolina said the school is understaffed. They only have 4 teachers for the entire school. So teachers double-up with classes. He has to do administrative work in addition to teaching and correcting papers. He also has to check the school on weekends because there are no doors or locks to protect their supplies.

 

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There is a deep well at the back of the school. In order to ensure safety, UNICEF installed pumps and pipes to bring in water nearer to the school. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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OIC of UNICEF’s WASH Program (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) Cromwell Bacareza shows me that water from the well is stored in a tank which is connected to these pipes. This is a makeshift lavatory where kids can wash their hands. It’s known as tippy tap. UNICEF supports schools affected by Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda by providing water, sanitation & hygiene facilities and supplies to ensure that children stay healthy, which helps them stay in school. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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The tippy tap is made of modest material. For a low cost, we can ensure that children have access to clean water. UNICEF also provided schools with soap. It is very important for children to wash their hands with soap and water. This needs to be instilled in them at a young age so that we can be healthy and germ-free. Because of the tippy tap, hand-washing becomes a social activity. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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UNICEF also installed safe and clean temporary toilets in every classroom. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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In another town called Abucay, I visited the temporary bunkhouses. This community had an amazing “Child-Friendly Space” set up by UNICEF. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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Inside the tent. A child plays…

 

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I kept falling in love with the babies. Cutie pie. Sigh.

 

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This child-friendly space in Abucay Bunkhouse in Tacloban is a place where young children can play, sing and dance under the guidance of city social welfare workers and volunteers.

 

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To date, more than 40,000 children across Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda-affected areas have accessed psychosocial support at child-friendly spaces provided by UNICEF.

 

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We took a walk around the Abucay temporary bunkhouses. One of the fathers was tending to his container garden. I love that there is a consciousness to grow food. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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With the bunkhouse manager Joseph dela Pena. The bunkhouse is one of the temporary housing programs provided by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD). It houses over 180 families with provision to water and sanitation facilities and a UNICEF child-friendly space tent.

 

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I loved seeing these ornaments decorating the alleys. These were made by the community.

 

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Before entering any house, I took my shoes off.

 

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This mother has five children. Except for the baby, they are all back in school. Her eyes welled up with tears when she recalled their experience when Haiyan/Yolanda hit. She said she and her husband hung on to all their kids and climbed the ceiling of a structure. They stayed there all day. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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A pretty young mom shares with me her experience breastfeeding her baby.

 

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I’m always happy to see a breastfeeding mom in any situation. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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I also visited a UNICEF-supported Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) counselling in Barangay 64, Tacloban City. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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This is a weekly program where mothers can get together and have counselling about nutrition, breastfeeding and maternal health issues. There is a child-friendly play space for toddlers.

 

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Another cutie pie.

 

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UNICEF Chief of Tacloban Field office Maulid Warfa and I spent some time playing with children while their mothers attend a UNICEF-supported Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) counselling in the adjacent room in Barangay 64, Tacloban City. IYCF counselling sessions ensure that parents and caregivers breastfeed and give proper nutritious food to their children to keep them healthy. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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City health workers in Sagkahan District Health Centre in Tacloban show me the vaccine refrigerator. UNICEF is providing vaccines, cold chain equipment, and vaccine management training for health personnel across Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda-affected areas. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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UNICEF is supporting the Department of Health (Philippines)’s National Immunization Campaign this September, which aims to protect 13 million children under 5 against polio, measles and rubella.

 

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It was good to see mothers bringing in their babies to get regular medical checks at the Sagkahan District Health Centre in Tacloban City. Cute baby alert again.

 

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I took the opportunity to film a short video to help fundraise for UNICEF. For information on how to donate, click here.

 

For information on UNICEF’s programs in the Philippines, visit www.unicef.ph and like Unicef Philippines in Facebook. To know about my work with UNICEF as Special Advocate for Children, click here.

 

My journey with UNICEF

 

 

 

This was the surprise video shown at my contract-signing event for UNICEF. The team put together this compilation of some of the work I’ve done with them the past three years. I didn’t realize we had been to so many places in a short time.

Last August I renewed my contract as Special Advocate for Children of UNICEF Philippines. It has been three years since I started my work with UNICEF. So much has happened since. We had a formal signing ceremony with UNICEF Representative Tomoo Hozumi. It was one of those moments that made me feel so proud because I am given a chance to do good work with this very important UN children’s agency.

At the event, the team talked about what it means to be chosen to work with UNICEF. The media release reads, “UNICEF celebrities are luminaries from various fields who all share dedication to improving the lives of children worldwide. Daphne joins the ranks of famous personalities such as David Beckham, Jackie Chan, Mia Farrow, Queen Rania of Jordan, Shakira, and UNICEF Philippines National Goodwill Ambassador Gary Valenciano in lending a strong voice that will draw attention to children’s issues.”

They showed us a video of Sir Roger Moore’s 20th year with UNICEF and it brought me to tears when he said “Unicef means doing something decent for the rest of my life…” Then right after, they showed my video.

 

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Renewing my contract as Special Advocate for Children. With UNICEF Representative Tomoo Hozumi.

 

I began my journey with UNICEF in early 2010 as a breastfeeding advocate. I went to a few sites around the country to speak about the many challenges faced by breastfeeding mothers and the support they needed to successfully breastfeed their babies. As part of my duties as Special Advocate, I’ve also been able to bring attention to important children’s issues such as early childhood care, clean water, malnutrition and armed conflict. I visited Ondoy-affected mothers in Laguna, mothers and infants in Sarangani, malnourished children in the ARMM/Maguindanao, frontline breastfeeding workers in Taguig and families displaced by Typhoon Pablo in Davao Oriental.

Now, in addition to the humanitarian work I do, I am also involved with fundraising. Not many people know that UNICEF is funded entirely from donations. In 2011, they allowed me to come up with an online art and design auction. We just finished the third Auction for Action — another success. Proceeds from the art auction will continue to benefit many children, giving them to access early childhood care and education programs.

I am brought back to my last big trip with UNICEF last March 2013, 100 days after Typhoon Pablo hit Davao Oriental. It was one of the biggest storms that hit our country. Three months after the emergency, UNICEF and other international organizations were still on site working to get things back to normal for the thousands of children affected by the storm. This was one of the most emotional trips I took with UNICEF — the people I met from humanitarian workers to the families who needed assistance touched me deeply. And I promised to tell their stories.

 

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The magnitude and scale of the damage was something I’d never seen. Three months after the storm, many international agencies were still on site trying to restore a sense of normalcy.

 

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We drove for hours from Davao International Airport and saw this common scene of fallen and naked trees. What made relief work complicated then was the inaccessibility and distance of the damaged areas from the city.

 

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With the team leader of the American Catholic Relief group at one of the “tent cities” supported by UNICEF.

 

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Some of the professionals had been in Davao Oriental for three months then. I was there for a few days and left with life-changing lessons.

 

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A daycare centre in Purok Sampaguita at Poblacion Daycare Center in Boston, Davao Oriental where Teacher Jocelyn was helping little kids cope with their fear of nature by introducing rain-themed song and dances. Most of these children witnessed great loss including death during Typhoon Pablo.

 

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Also at Purok Sampaguita, Poblacion Daycare Center, this young boy recounts what he witnessed during the storm. Photo by Kat Palasi

 

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At Dapnan Elementary School in Baganga, Davao Oriental where almost every school building was destroyed.

 

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This young boy runs through the ruins of the old school’s main building which was originally built during the American colonial period.

 

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There were only two classrooms left untouched by the storm at Dapnan Elementary School. Kids were back to regular schedule then (100 days after the storm).

 

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Most levels were integrated and classrooms were shared.

 

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Some kids were still in tents then.

 

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One of the fifth-graders shared with me her diary about the events. She was among the students who hid in the main building which eventually was completely blown away by the storm.

 

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I don’t often get to go on these humanitarian missions. In the few times I’ve gone, I’ve had to think more than twice about leaving my own kids for a few days. I wish that kids don’t have to be exposed to so much danger and distress. Unfortunately this is the reality of living in our country. We are right in the Pacific “Ring of Fire” – where earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and storms are common. The key is for local governments and individuals to be prepared.

 

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A very sweet older brother.

 

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I will never forget this mother. She was recalling the moments when Typhoon Pablo struck and how they are coping three months after. She said that every time her little daughter would hear thunder or strong winds, she’d curl up and cry. She told me that as a mother the only thing she could do now is to hold her daughter tightly so she’d feel safe. Photo by Kat Palasi.

 

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Former gym Purok Sampaguita, Poblacion Daycare Center,Boston,Davao Oriental. Photo by Kat Palasi

 

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Fallen coconut trees. This was the scenery we saw driving through Davao Oriental for hours. Photo by Kat Palasi.

 

I often get asked by readers and viewers about how they, too, can be part of UNICEF. The easiest and fastest way to make a difference is by making a donation… especially at this time, with the many emergencies in our country.

Help BOHOL

The 7.2 magnitude earthquake last October 15, 2013 brought massive destruction to the province of Bohol. An estimated 380,000 people are now without homes or living in makeshift tents in open spaces or by the roadside. Children need safe drinking water, hygiene kits, toilets, adequate nutrition, shelter, and a safe learning environment to recover from this emergency.

 

 

 

UNICEF Auction for Action Year 3

 

 

We held the press preview for my third UNICEF Auction for Action last week. Lots of new developments since we first started in 2011. I can’t believe that in the two times we’ve done it, we’ve raised over P4.5 million pesos all in online auctions. This year, I have a bigger goal. Will you help me raise P5 million?

Auction for Action started as a small idea between me, Angela Travis (then Head of Communications for Unicef Philippines) and the fundraising team. Initially I relied on goodwill from friends and relationships I cultivated after years of focusing on design. Now we have a full team organizing the auction and we have partners approaching us to help and get involved.

It is a huge honour for me to be given the chance to get all my great loves together in a project that means so well — my love for art, design, media and children. I am so grateful for the opportunity to curate another auction of this magnitude.

Since it is held in October again, we are honouring National Children’s Month, with Auction for Action 2013 bringing together over 90 artists in art, design, furniture and jewelry. We are specifically raising funds to benefit a unique education program to provide children access to early learning: Supervised Neighborhood Play Program (SNP).

I had the chance to see Supervised Neighbourhood Play Program first hand when I visited Davao Oriental last March, 100 days after Typhoon Pablo devastated the area. There I saw a preschool teacher singing songs and acting out lyrics with her 5-year old students. It was the “raindrop song” – so simple yet so full of impact. These are kids who witnessed a scary storm that destroyed their town and killed people and animals. They need the raindrop song and other educational methods to help them cope with trauma.

This year’s Auction for Action will go live on ebay.ph/unicef on October 21 to 27. I will post links then. For now, feel free to read more here.

 

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This year, we partner with Yuchengco Museum, who not only hosted the site of our press preview but will also host the public preview everyday at the Yuchengco Museum lobby.

 

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This is my only shot of the Yuchengco lobby facade from the inside. It is accessible through RCBC tower in the ground floor. Admission to Unicef Auction for Action is free. You can see most of our auction items everyday up to 6pm except on Sundays.

 

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With me is Dr Willibald Zeck, UNICEF’s Chief of Health and Nutrition, who is also a published artist in Austria. He donated another one of his abstract works. Also in photo is Mr Tomoo Hozumi, Country Representative of Unicef. (The red painting is by Roceli Valencia, “Meditation in Red”. And the little guy is Hari Sonik by Elmer Borlongan).

 

I have to warn you that this blog post will overdose with photos of me. For some reason, that’s all I have in my camera and in the official camera. I promise to post detail product shots of the items at a later date.

A bit more about Supervised Neighborhood Play – It is a simple, low-cost and easy to organize home-based early learning program where trained day care workers or parent volunteers gather young children in a house, a shaded play area or under a tree for two to three hours, every day for at least ten months to help children learn through organized play. UNICEF supports the SNP program in remote, conflict or disaster-affected communities and in informal settlements located in urban and rural areas.

 

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Dr Zeck presenting his abstract painting. Also seen in photo is Raymond Legaspi’s “The Sack Race” and Olivia d’Aboville’s “Liquid Heaven”

 

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Domicillo Mirror and Jinggoy Buensuceso’s Moth chair. We have two, in black and this marigold.

 

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Kinks and Curls lamp by Vikki Rodriguez for Accessoria.

 

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Stunning oil painting by my classmate from elementary, Sandra Fabie Gfeller, who is a celebrated artist. You can also see Stanley Ruiz’s Wheelbarrow. I have a Daphne Chair in the lot too. All the auction pieces come with a commemorative brass plate this year. See the man with the magnifying lens? He is looking at a miniature water colour by Gregory Raymond Halili.

 

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Foreground, Seb Chua sculpture. Olivia d’Aboville’s Anemone table lamp and behind me is Michael Cacnio’s Sweet. Candy Crush fans would love that one.

 

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TRANSFORMER earrings by Janina Dizon Hoschka. These dangling earrings consists of a brilliant cut blue topaz with green tsavorites and a pear shaped amethyst top in yellow silver. The middle part are bezel set amethysts with white sapphires in the double happiness symbol. Bottom danglers are made with icy blue amazonite drops in silver. These earrings can be worn five ways.

 

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Tomoo Hozumi checking out the detailing of Kawayan Tech’s bamboo bike. The world is catching on to this bamboo bike technology. Even Marc Jacobs designed one here.

 

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Mr Hozumi trying the Kawayan Tech bike. You can see in the background – Leeroy New’s Entropy, Hamzah Marbella’s Catching Fish , Dominic Rubio’s Father and Two Sons, Pete Jimenez’ Play it by Ear , and Manuel Baldemor’s Filipino Family.

 

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National Book Store donated 10 signed books. We’ve decided to auction them all individually. Stella wants to bid on the Eric Carle’s “The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse.” You can see a beautiful carved ostrich egg lamp by artist Danny Rayos del Sol.

 

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And our major highlight, Kenneth Cobonpue’s sculpture Coral. Kenneth has not shown this piece to the public yet. It makes its debut here at Auction for Action. That gorgeous blue and white painting is by Popo San Pascual. He never fails to amaze me. The desk lamp is by Chito Vijandre and Ricky Toledo of Firma Makati.

 

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We have an impressive collection of jewelry and accessories from – Amina Aranaz, Kristine Dee, Paul Syjuco, Janina Dizon-Hoschka, Jewelmer Joaillerie, Joyce Makitalo, Ann Ong, Ana Rocha, SC Vizcarra and Nicole Whisenhunt.

 

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A closer look at Leeroy New, Kawayan Tech push bike for kids, Hamzah Marbella and Mitch Shivers’ Log-in.

 

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Grateful to Patty Laurel for attending the press preview with her lovely mom and sister. Thank you to my Bench family for my pretty dress from Karen Millen.

 

Bid for one-of-a-kind pieces from notable Filipino artists and designers and help make a difference for children. The auction goes live on October 21-27, 2013 at www.ebay.ph/unicef.

For a preview, visit www.unicef.ph or go to the Yuchengco Museum from October 3 to 26 at the RCBC Plaza, Makati City.

This year’s auction is made possible through the generous participation of the Philippine Star, Yuchengco Museum, Summit Media, Consuelo Zobel Alger Foundation, EBay Philippines, Citem and Manila Fame.

 

 

Jewelmer for Unicef

 

 

I’ve written about my love for Jewelmer many times. Some have asked if I am a Jewelmer endorser. Technically, no. I’ve never appeared in any of their ad campaigns. But Jewelmer was a major sponsor of F for many years. And that’s the depth of my relationship with their brand. Up to now, when I have special occasions, I can call on them and request to wear their pieces. I did just that last February during our informal F reunion.

 

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With Cher Calvin, Angel Aquino and Amanda Griffin last February 2012. We were drowning (happily) in Jewelmer pearls.

 

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Jewelmer spent the whole media day with us and adorned us in Philippine south sea pearls.

 

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We were photographed by Jake Versoza.

 

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Played dress up. My gown was by Hindy Tantoco. We were styled by Millet Arzaga and MAC Cosmetics team.

 

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Golden south sea pearls never cease to amaze me. These are endemic to the Philippines. Thus, our National Gem.

 

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OMG right?

 

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They are just so stunning.

 

Designing something. But this golden baroque south sea pearl from Jewelmer is so beautiful as is..
My golden baroque south sea pearl from Jewelmer. I waited months before an idea came up for the setting. Technically this is a baroque pearl even though it looks almost perfectly round to me.

 

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I had it set in 18k gold by Jewelmer using their Stella ring design. But I took out the diamonds on the sides. I wanted the pearl to appear suspended and naked.

 

This is what I did to my golden south sea pearl from @Jewelmer. I wanted the pearl to appear like it's floating. #happy
I always get complimented whenever I wear this ring. And it’s totally simple!

 

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This is the strand of south sea pearls Jewelmer donated to UNICEF. This is how it appears in the catalog.

 

Beautiful golden south sea pearl strand from #Jewelmer. In the UNICEF #auction4action.
Here’s what it looked like on my Instagram.

 

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And here’s what it looks like on me. I am falling in love with this strand. Photo by Kat Palasi 2012.

 

I can’t get over the fact that Jewelmer donated an entire strand of golden south sea pearls to UNICEF’s Auction for Action. I would love this piece to go way above market price to raise more funds for children. But you’ll never know how auctions turn out. You could end up with a strand that’s half the price of retail. Watch this piece on Monday…

 

 

 

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