National Museum of Natural History

 

 

NATMUSEUM

 

Earlier in 2018, I started hosting a new TV show called CREATE. It aired in Colours channel carried through the Cignal cable subscription, and continues to air in ONE News. The show is about profiles of creative people. One episode focuses on one subject. Our first season ran well, we are now about to produce our second season. We took a break because I went on a 10 week vacation in our Toronto home. I thought it was more than appropriate to end our first season with a profile on Dominic Galicia, an architect I respect so much.

I have come to know Dominic’s work in the two decades I’ve lived in the Philippines first through the churches he’s built, and the many houses I’ve featured in Urban Zone. I love what he has done in the National Museum of Natural History.

The original neoclassical building was built in 1930 by Antonio Toledo as the Agriculture and Commerce. It had been used as the offices of the Senate of the Philippines for some time, until the National Museum started to integrate the three buildings into a museum complex – including the National Museum of Anthropology and Fine Arts. The pitch of Dominic Galicia Architects and Periquet Galicia interior architects won the bid for the restoration of the National Museum of Natural History and construction started in 2013. It took five years to complete.

The visual focal point of the new National Museum, of course, is the Tree of Life that stands in middle of the atrium.

 

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The architect, Dominic Galicia, explains to me the metaphor of the “Tree of Life” – it is both biblical, mythological, and philosophical.

 

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One of the requirements of the project was to make use of the central space created in the inner courtyard. It once was open and exposed to the elements. Dominic and his team though of creating a central structure like the tree with its canopy covering the space. It is interesting to note that the original structure of the museum does not bear any of the weight of this new structure. It is fully supported by the trunk of the “tree.”

 

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The edges of the canopy of the Tree of Life do not rest directly on the roof and walls of the old building. The weight is completely supported by the trunk of the tree which houses an elevator inside. The Tree of Life is not only symbolic, it is also functional.

 

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A current highlight when visiting the National Museum now is the taxidermies body of Lolong, the world’s largest crocodile caught and placed in captivity, who has now become the iconic “superstar” of the museum. He was caught in Agusan del Sur in September 2011 and unfortunately died while in captivity in February 2013.

 

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This is the taxidermied body of Lolong, displayed in the main atrium.

 

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Lolong’s tail

 

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The walls and windows surrounding the museum were lined with translucent prints of wildlife indigenous to the Philippines. This is the tarsier.

 

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View from upper ramp

 

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I was led to the base of the Tree of Life, where Dominic Galicia showed me the entrance to the elevator.

 

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The elevator shaft in the middle of the trunk is encased in glass.

 

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View from inside the elevator, looking up.

 

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Once you are on the top of the Tree of Life, the elevator opens to this walkway that leads to the galleries. The view from here is quite spectacular.

 

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We continued our interview here.

 

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I asked Dominic to show me the gallery where the 700,000 year old rhino bone was. Since we shot on a Monday, while the museum was closed, the gallery was locked. The actual bones of Lolong is prominently displayed, hung from the ceiling.

 

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This corner gallery is a very impressive space. It used to hold two floors. The project’s interior architect Tina Periquet removed the second floor. The tall arched windows give the larger space a unified feel. Notice the hexagon patterns repeating itself on the mosaic floor and the coffered ceiling? Not only is it visually appealing, it is also symbolic of the shape of DNA, which is the foundation of all the fossils and artefacts displayed in the Natural History museum.

 

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The display cabinet of the 700,000-year-old rhinoceros bone and hacking tool was empty.

 

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Looked like some final touches were being done in the display case. The 700,000 year old rhino bone was on the table. Note that the room was locked. None of us entered.

 

I think the rhino bone should be the star of the museum more than Lolong, the crocodile. But that can be debatable.

This find is so significant not just to the Filipinos but to the rest of the world. A bit of a background, the artifacts (bone and tool) were found in an a river flood plain in Luzon beside a butchered carcass of a rhinoceros. “The ancient toolmakers were clearly angling for a meal. Two of the rhino’s limb bones are smashed in, as if someone was trying to harvest and eat the marrow inside. Cut marks left behind by stone blades crisscross the rhino’s ribs and ankle, a clear sign that someone used tools to strip the carcass of meat.” (Source, National Geographic linked below).

Researches estimate the age of the remains to be 709,000 years old. The earliest evidence of Philippine hominins were found in Callao Cave, and dated to only 67,000 years ago. This rhino bone and tool suggests that the Philippines was occupied before the known origin of our species, homo sapiens. One of the questions is how did early hominins get to the Philippines in the first place. Read more in this National Geographic article, published in May 2018 here.

 

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The ramp to be experienced going down.

 

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A big treat was getting to walk in the private halls and offices of the museum. My imagination was working full force. What could be inside these cabinets?

 

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Interesting artifacts and fossils

 

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I did not touch

 

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Still in progress when we visited in May 2018.

 

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With the production team of CREATE. Exclusively shown in Cignal’s Colours and ONENews channels.

 

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Dominic Galicia, architect.

 

Watch the full episode here: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PICC

 

 

PICC

 

I was invited by the management of the PICC – Philippine International Convention Center to spend an afternoon touring the facility. It may appear like the most random invite. The PICC isn’t your typical tourist place. Since I have publicly declared that the PICC is my favourite building in Manila, being invited there isn’t so random in my books.

I used to sneak in to the PICC and pretend to be scouting locations for events just to marvel at the massive concrete slabs, clean lines, smooth curves, and dramatic lights of the public spaces and private meeting halls. For most Filipinos, the PICC is the site of their graduation or professional convention. For me, it was neither of those, but I considered it an architectural gem, a reminder of a period in our history that is so intertwined with my personal family history.

Some facts: The Philippine International Convention Center is Asia’s first convention facility built specifically for a world event. It opened in 1976 by former President Ferdinand Marcos for the 1976 IMF-World Bank Meeting. It was built and completed in 23 months on land reclaimed from Manila Bay. The PICC was designed by National Artist for Architecture Leandro V. Locsin. The architectural style of the PICC complements the Cultural Center of the Philippines’ brutalist style. The PICC is managed separately as a government-owned and controlled corporation ultimately under the ownership of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas.

 

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The PICC’s Main Lobby’s grand staircase and 3,000+ drop lights hanging from the ceiling.

 

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An enormous painting by National Artist José T. Joya painting in the lobby. It is entitled “Ang Pagdiriwang,” and measures 5m x 8m.

 

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An HR Ocampo triptych at the management office of PICC. The art collection housed at the PICC belong to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas.

 

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Another large work by Jose T. Joya, a sculpture in wood. This is almost as tall as me.

 

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The sculpture garden was recently decorated with sculpture gifts from APEC member countries that participated in the 1996 conference in Manila. *

 

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Appreciating the lines and curves of these office stairs. *

 

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Another staircase, this time surrounded by original wood parkay flooring from 1976 . *

 

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One of the reception halls, prepared for an event later that day. The PICC can host meetings, conferences, birthday parties, and weddings. Big or small. *

 

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Original chandeliers at Reception Hall. *

 

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Loving the chandeliers. Photo by PIAA.

 

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The same red carpet staircase where St Mother Teresa and St Pope John Paul passed through. *

 

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Everytime I visit the PICC during an event, I always stop to admire this walkway leading to the Plenary Hall.

 

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The Garden. *

 

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The path leading to the garden is inspired by the painting of Joya. *

 

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Sculpture by Arturo Luz. *

 

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I will always appreciate the clean lines and minimalism of this building. *

 

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The Amorsolo restaurant on the second floor of the PICC Secretariat Building is open daily from Mondays to Fridays at 11:00 am to 2:00 p.m. It is operated by the Via Mare Corporation.

 

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One of the meeting halls has a small theatre. *

 

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One of the things I love to gush over, and is most often unappreciated, is the detailing of the wall panels. *

 

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Carved in wood, these panels surround the interior of the theatre and meeting halls for the purposes of controlling sound and reducing noise. *

 

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These benches are designed and carved by  by National Artist for sculpture, Napoleon Abueva. *

 

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The exterior deck of the Summit Halls has a view of the Manila Bay and may be used for outdoor events.

 

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Lunch w the founder of Via Mare Glenda Barretto and PICC’s GM Renato Padilla. Via Mare is the exclusive caterer of PICC.

 

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A special setting for me. I was totally surprised by this.

 

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The menu, carefully prepared for me. I always associated PICC with big events, but it also makes for a quaint little venue for small events. Ask about the small dining rooms and meeting halls.

 

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My lunch.

 

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Lunch company.

 

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Crepes for dessert.

 

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With Via Mare’s Mrs Glenda Barretto. *

 

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Renato B. Padilla, PICC’s General Manager. *

 

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An untitled Arturo Luz sculpture. *

 

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With PICC’s Dinah Gonzalez and Portia Cabiad. *

 

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Outfit: I wore a white shirt and black skirt, both from Uniqlo. And kitten heel pumps from French Sole.

 

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Thank you, PICC.

 

 

Photos marked with “*” are taken by Marty Ilagan. With additional photos from my phone.

 

 

Lily’s favourite moment

 

 

Things have been so crazy for me lately. I’m not working on a big project or anything specific. But I feel busier than usual. It’s like everything from real life just piled up. I fill my hours and minutes doing so much at home, at work, at my kids’ school, I can’t seem to accomplish anything at the end of the day. Everything is half-done. This is the multi-tasker’s nightmare. Busy but feeling unaccomplished. How did this happen?

I told Patrick, I wish I could go on a long haul flight just so I could watch movies uninterrupted. Heck I’d be happy riding a P2P (point to point) bus from Glorietta to Trinoma just to watch one film in its entirety.

So we got to talking hypothetical situations. “What would you do if you didn’t have to work or do homework?” My answer was, “watch movies.”

Lily’s answer got me.

“I would sit on a rock under a tree, facing a lake or a pond. There, I will sketch and paint. Just like that time in Shanghai, Mom.”

Lily was referring to that time last April when I brought her to Shanghai with me while I filmed for AirAsia Red Talks. It was not the usual travel situation because it was for my work. I told her ahead of time, that the priority is to film Mama in specific scenes. So she would just have to cooperate.

My girl was more than cooperative. She was a real trooper. She walked patiently on The Bund while we waited for the light to change. She saw our team shoot a time-lapse of the skyline for what seemed like an hour, just to get a good 10 second footage of the sunset. Everywhere we went, she brought a book, a sketchbook, and a few pens.

 


This is the moment imprinted in her memory.

 


The rock. The little pond. The trees.

 


Lily sketched the trees in her paper notebook. But drew more details in her head. Today she still talks about the light and the pleasant weather.

 


I remember loving that moment too. That’s why I took so many photos of her while she was in her zone.

 

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Our candid moments were captured by some of our crew members.

 

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I valued that day too. This became my screensaver for the past six months.

 

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We had a lot of special moments during that work trip. This was our first night, shooting at The Bund. Lily was tired. She got sad and missed her sisters.

 

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Another sketch time. While waiting for the bus, she found a spot to sit on near the Shanghai Expo red building.

 

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When she was so afraid to step on the glass floor at the Oriental Pearl Tower, but I didn’t want her to miss the chance for a great photo. So we just sat together and got the shot.

 

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Another must photo spot on The Bund

 

I brought Lily as my “plus one” on this shoot trip because it was her turn. I already had travelled alone with Sophia. We went to France when she attended a two-week camp in Gerardmer and Paris. (Note, that after Lily got back and talked to her sisters about the great time she had with me, Sophia asked if she could go back next in line to travel with me too. She says the France trip shouldn’t count because it wasn’t so much a mother-daughter experience, she was focused on doing the camp experience. She’s right. And I can’t wait to take her on a trip next. And Stella too.)

I will write a separate story about why these one-on-one dates with daughters (or sons) matter so much. For now, I hope you enjoy this video from our AirAsia Red Talks series. There are six episodes in this series, which you can find in the AirAsia Facebook Page. This one documented my Shanghai trip with Lily, and it ends with a poem (not written by me) about why we travel.

 

 

 

 

 

Amanpulo with Kerastase

 

 

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Not too long ago, I was rolling around the pure white sand beaches of Amanpulo for three days. I had just signed on as one of the new brand ambassadors of Kérastase. To relaunch the brand and new lines, Kérastase flew me, Amina Aranaz-Alunan, and Amanda Griffin-Jacob to Palawan together with our special guests and members of lifestyle press. Amina and Amanda brought their husbands. I brought my mom. My parents were visiting us at the time, and Patrick and I had just had our JUNK trip (Just Us, No Kids) so I felt that my mom would really love the tropical island treat and the whole luxurious experience. And she did.

A week before our trip, I had the most amazing salon experience at the Kérastase Institute in 6750 Makati. I used to just use shampoo and conditioner for semi-oily hair. I had no idea that hair has individual issues and needs that can be specifically addressed via a scientific hair diagnosis. At the Kérastase Institute they had all the instruments to determine your hair’s needs. It truly is very personal care, which coincidentally is the campaign’s message. They had 10 color-coded hair-care ranges, and mine was the Discipline line. More on that in a future post. Check out the video of my Kérastase Institute experience.

The salon experience was an indication that we were in for some very personal care in the island paradise of Amanpulo. There were some very special, personalized touches from the moment we boarded the chartered plane to the island, to the lovely gifts in our rooms, to the engraved crystal glasses at our last dinner.

The experience was unforgettable, and I am so grateful I got to share these gifts with my mom. Let me tell this story via photos…

 

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I won’t dwell on how small planes scare me. But we flew to Amanpulo and back in great comfort (and safety, thank God).

 

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Pamalican Island, Palawan better known as Amanpulo.

 

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Me and my mom.

 

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Loved the personal pillow.

 

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We were all picked up in golf carts. And driven to our own casitas.

 

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After which the golf cart was turned over to me and mom. I was to be her designated driver for the whole stay.

 

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Bedroom

 

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Someone was very happy.

 

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There was a wrap around porch.

 

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The bathroom. Spot the Kérastase surprises.

 

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Kérastase Discipline for me. This line is for unruly curly hair. But because my hair isn’t technically curly, it just gets frizzy whenever it feels like it, I just needed smoothness. For that my routine calls for Bain Fluidéaliste sans Sulfate (sulfate-free shampoo to smoothen and rid hair of frizz), Maskératine (a mask to leave hair soft, smooth, and with weightless fluidity), and Keratine Thermique (a pre-styling cream to protect hair before blow-drying and use of heat styling tools, leaving hair smooth and shiny).

 

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My mom had to answer a series of questions, and based on those she was given the Spécifique line which focuses on scalp-related issues like itchiness, dandruff, hair loss and oily roots. Her shampoo is the Spécifique Bain Vital Dermo-Calm to moisturize and purify her scalp to calm irritation and inflammation. She also has the Cure Apaisante, a concentrated 4-week treatment to sooth her scalp.

 

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Right after we settled in, we hit the beach. The casitas are all behind the bushes, so they are not visible from the beach.

 

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I parked myself in one of the lounge chairs.

 

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Drove to the clubhouse to check it out.

 

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Dress code for dinner was Moroccan.

 

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But first, the sunset.

 

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The evening was Moroccan-themed for the launch of Kérastase Aura Botanica.

 

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Kérastase Aura Botanica is made of 96% natural origin ingredients with handpicked and responsibly-sourced Samoan coconut & Moroccan Argan oils. It contains no silicones, no sulfates, and no parabens.

 

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The AURA BOTANICA Concentre Essentiel Aromatic Nourishing Oil Blend. It is a multipurpose oil, comprised of 99% natural origin ingredients. Renewable avocado oil, rich in Omegas 6 and 9, and jojoba oil add softness and shine to hair, while the rosemary extract helps preserve the oils. It is highlighted by an aromated fragrance of sweet orange essential oil.

 

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Despite the Moroccan theme, we had Filipino food.

 

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Loved everything!

 

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Ferdie Salvador, Javi Martinez, Rafa Alunan, Amina Aranaz-Alunan, Tim Yap, Amanda Griffin, me and my mom.

 

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With Amina and Amanda, video by Pam Quinones, editor in chief of L’Oficiel Philippines

 

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The next morning we hit the beach and went snorkeling.

 

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Editors in kaftans and big hats. Inquirer’s Cheche Moral, Town & Country’s Yvette Fernandez, and Philippine Star’s Therese Garceau.

 

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Took a break from snorkeling and soaked up some sun.

 

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Happiness by the sea. Always. I wanted to remember this moment because I used to go scuba diving every weekend. It was one of the reasons I stayed in the Philippines for an extended period. Had an overwhelming feeling of gratitude. I always feel God’s presence when I am underwater, even if I’m just snorkeling.

 

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We had a nice light lunch back at the beach.

 

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Salad and antipasti

 

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Those artichokes.

 

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After lunch, back to the beach.

 

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The rest of the group went out on the boat again while I stayed behind and went paddle boarding by myself.

 

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Then the boat came to my direction and suddenly I had everyone taking photos of me. Yay. Photo by Pam Quinones.

 

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The reason the boat came my way, it turned out that a resident pawikan (sea turtle) was a spotted near me. So some of the people in our group jumped into the water to look for the turtle. Photo by Pierra Calasanz Labrador

 

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And there he was, the lovely giant sea turtle (pawikan) as captured on video by ABS-CBN’s Marie Lozano. And how’s that for a money shot? That’s me!

 

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Amanpulo is completely surrounded by fine white sand. You can walk around the island!

 

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Even birds leave their footsteps on the sand.

 

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On the night of the relaunch of Kérastase, we were all asked to wear white. The set up was so lovely.

 

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Mom loved all the pretty details…

 

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…beautiful orchids…

 

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And this lovely souvenir. We all got engraved crystal wine glasses.

 

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It was  magical.

 

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Kaila Nicdao of Kérastase

 

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My video campaign was first shown.

 

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It was so lovely being with Amina and my fellow F girl, Amanda.

 

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All of us.

 

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The Kérastase team.

 

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With Nik Pedro and Janlee Dungca

 

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More handwritten notes and special gifts from Kaila Nicdao of Kérastase.

 

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We wrote postcards to home.

 

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It was hard to say goodbye.

 

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On our last morning before we flew back home, my mom woke me up while it was still dark. She said, “Do you want to see the sunrise?” I dragged myself out of bed and went walking with her in the dark. I have photos and videos, and they were pitch black. There was nobody in the beach except us. We didn’t really talk. It was too early. Neither of us had coffee yet. But we just walked side by side until the sun went up. By this time we saw an Amanpulo staff working on a docked boat. And I asked him to take our picture. This has got to be one of my most memorable moments with my mom.

 

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I’m so glad I had spent this time with my mom. In all the years I’ve been living and working in the Philippines, my family rarely gets to see my work. This time, not only did my mom get to come with me to Amanpulo, she saw the relaunch of Kérastase with my video, and experience Kérastase Very Personal Care with me. Photo by Cholo de la Vega

 

 

MAC SS2017 Trends

 

 

Not too long ago, I was whisked off to a lovely tropical destination for two days by MAC Cosmetics. They’ve done something similar before, a couple of years ago. They brought us (editors and bloggers) to Shangri-la Boracay. This time, we were invited to Shangri-la Mactan.

 

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I love flying over our islands.

 

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Welcome gifts in our room. The MAC Strobe Cream has become my daily pick-me-upper. Just dab a little bit on upper corner of cheekbones and you instantly look like you have inner glow and radiance.

 

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First stop, lunch at Cowrie Cove. Here with Geolette Esguerra of ABS-CBN publishing.

 

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Our first event was for the launch of MAC Shadescents.

 

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Six new scents were launched. Each represented a cult-favourite lipstick colour — Creme d’Nude, Velvet Teddy, Candy Yum-Yum, Lady Danger, Ruby Woo, and My Heroine.

 

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My Heroine is described as “an intoxicating and totally unexpected fragrance composed of rich and primal Cordovan leather.”

 

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The room was set up with six long tables. Each table represented a scent, which was interpreted with floral settings.

 

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The cocktail reception during sunset was so pretty, I forgot to take pictures. Each scent was also interpreted into cocktail drinks.

 

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MAC Shadescent ambassadors – Megan Young, Karylle, Stephanie Zubiri, and Tessa Prieto.

 

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With the editors – Liza Ilarde, Mia Borromeo, Raul Manzano, and Tessa Prieto.

 

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The lovely guests.

 

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On the second day, MAC provided us with makeup services in the comforts of our own rooms. My regular makeup artist, Ria Aquino, did an express 30-minute face for me. I love it. That lip colour!

 

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She did a quick set up in my room. For those of you who want makeup services, they do this as a package in all MAC counters — for P3,000 or P5,000 all consumable, you get free makeup services.

 

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For the SS 2017 trend report, MAC set up at the tent in Shangrila Mactan. In photo with Vicky Abary, Tessa, Mia, and Liza.

 

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So in love with the setting… our prints weren’t so bad either. My shoes are from Melissa.

 

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Inside the tent, MAC Artist RB Changco assisted the bloggers and guests in choosing our own makeup shades.

 

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The editor gang.

 

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Director of Makeup Artistry for MAC Cosmetics, Gregory Alt with the four Spring Summer 2017 looks — Warm, Wet, Real, and Free.

 

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There is an overarching tendency for makeup to lean toward the (apparently) nonchalant this season. This ranges from the literal “bare face” – aptly described by Diane Kendal as “grooming for girls,” and Gordon Espinet as “next to nothing, but not literally nothing” – to stronger looks that are specifically finished to give the impression of belonging to the individual (as opposed to applied by a makeup artist). An essential feature of modern makeup this season is appearing, in some way, “broken down.”

This direction is a direct reference to the real makeup that real women wear: Brazil nut brown or residual black on the eyes, a remnant of lipstick (or at least one that doesn’t look highly perfected), clean, ostensibly bare skin. “Everything feels very easy, unforced,” says Val Garland. “It’s not about being conceptual,” agrees Sam Bryant. “It’s about looking hyper-real.”

Worn-in and worn off: this is makeup that migrates. It is corporeal; it lives and breathes, thanks to what Lyne Desnoyers describes as “malleable textures” – creams and glosses that wrap around and into the features. These finishes have a humanity to them that breaks the powdered and perfected convention of “sophistication.”

Which is all to say that this unstudied effect is the height of modern chic. As Terry Barber perfectly summarizes: “True beauty is all about style, not physical perfection.”

 

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Gregory worked the “Real” trend on Steph.  – the enduring appeal of the real – unfiltered realism to beauty that lives and breathes as women wear it, worn-in and enhancing, never heavy

 

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Dynamic and vibrant, colour has a free-form feel for SS17. Elated, vivid and always worn against nothing else – so that it feels abstracted and spontaneous – the free spirit of SS17 plays into the movement for “individual” makeup. It ignores any rules on placement, proportion or convention and deliberately declares itself as something singularly adorning. “It is a marking rather than a classic beauty gesture, which enhances the features in a non-traditional sense,” says Alex Box.

“It is playful, not serious,” says Val Garland. “The opposite of taking yourself seriously and filtering your selfies.”

Naïve in effect, if not technique. “Seeming spontaneity is much more difficult to craft than perfection,” points out Terry Barber. Free makeup is about “precision and play in equal measure,” adds Box.

As much as this quality of makeup makes a joyous expressionist statement, they are mesmerically beautifying, too. “These colour accents energize the face,” says Lyne Desnoyers. “They break apart ‘good taste’ to better define it for now.”

 

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The look of Free on Karylle – stamps and slashes of expressionist colour that provide an inspiringly abstract moment in the art of SS17 makeup: energetic, gestural and refreshingly unconventional.

 

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The art of mimicking light on the skin (and replicating a radiance coming from within it) is an enduring preoccupation for makeup artists. The reason is simple: “There is a modern simplicity to shine that is also incredibly flattering,” says Val Garland. This season, artists are captivated with light and reflection in its purest sense – as a texture. “Glosses, oils and shines look authentic, as if they come from within the skin,” continues Garland. “Shimmers and powders always tend to look more like makeup.”

As the fashion industry’s response to the very filtered and tuned approach to mass-culture beauty, this tendency is all about the exploration and celebration of how balm, oil and emollient texture works to enrich and humanize makeup. Gloss can look clean, groomed and pure or equally nod to a sweaty, worn-in urbanism. “Gloss brings out the athleticism in the bone structure but also enhances the individuality of makeup by breaking it down,” explains Lynsey Alexander. “Anti-perfection looks very modern,” adds Tom Pecheux. “Luxury now has real identity to it.”

Congruent with the omnipresence of wet texture is the continuing appeal of “natural” skin in its truest sense: the cliché that “less is more” has never been truer, as the treatment that Gordon Espinet describes as “#nofilter” has become the new fashion standard. In short, concealer where necessary with skincare stepping up as the modern replacement for matte or reflective foundations (Val Garland’s favourite recipe:
Mineralize Timecheck Lotion for a velvet matte finish, Prep + Prime Moisture Infusion to mimic plump hydration, Care Blends Essential Oils on the cheekbones). The role of powder, too, has been given a rethink: today it deliberately enhances and amplifies shine by being placed against it. “Like applying all-over foundation, the idea of homogeneously powdering the entire face is old-fashioned,” confirms Lyne Desnoyers.

Hence, the story of gloss this season is super strategic. “It all looks massaged in, not artificial and is very specifically placed,” says Barber of the way that gleam works on the eyes, cheeks, lips and temples. “It’s about exploring different weights and depths
of reflection. Building up considered layers, from skincare glazes to points of vinyl shine.”

The best tool? “Your fingers,” says Alexander. “Their warmth helps gloss become one with the skin.”

 

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Megan sports the Wet trend – the visceral beauty of wet gloss – from sweat to humidity, the perennial fascination with how light fits and flatters a face is explored as a texture, from vinyl shine to emollient sheen.

 

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WARM

This is beauty at its most feminine. Sunned, summery and inspired by the brighter side of nature, artists are pulling from an organic palette, applying these heated shades in soft
washes and tints. “These colours are designed to enhance and mimic really great skin condition,” says Terry Barber, emphasizing that texture is vital to this point: “The modern
way to wear them is in textures that have an affinity with the complexion.”

Which means you should see the skin through them, and give it a bit of a sheen or gloss, as SS17’s preoccupation with shine extends to this tendency in makeup, too.

“These are very classic beautifying tones,” says Lyne Desnoyers of the optimistic, flora-inflected palette. “But what makes them interesting and feel new is all in the finish we give them; most notably, what the application of an oil or gloss does to the way they bring life to the face.”

From a flush to a blush to a bronzed skin and myriad pinkish to peach tints on the eyes and lips, think of these shades as a means to heighten nature rather than cover.

“Peach, pink and tan look alive and fresh when applied with transparency,” says Mark Carrasquillo. “They are what I call very heightening colours.” So while shine textures are the way to update rose and apricot tones for today, there is nothing complex or conceptual about this ultra-feminine leaning in makeup. “It’s not about transforming the face,” explains Tom Pecheux. “It’s simply about making it look more beautiful.”

 

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Gregory works the Warm trend on Bianca Manalo – a palette drawn from the heat of the environment (the sun, the beach, petals, terracotta, crystals, the earth) worn with a simplicity that renders it modern.

 

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The boundaries between the four tendencies are distinctly blurred – characteristics of ease, broken texture and elements of gloss are innate to them all. Which is indicative of the fact that there is no strict prescription to makeup today, no hard and fast rules that delineate one makeup direction from another. Wear them your way.

 

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Magic hour in Mactan

 

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For our last night, there was this fabulous beach party set up.

 

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With Gregory Arlt. A day after this he was back in LA with Gwen Stefani.

 

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White party.

 

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Our MAC loot included a selfie light.

 

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Testing it.

 

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