Barcelona food

 

 

BARC FEAST TILE

 

Last December, just before the Christmas rush, I travelled to Barcelona with a 2-person team from Lifestyle Network. It was a surprise bonus from being Samsung Digital Home’s brand ambassador at the time. We filmed some interstitials called “DAPHNE Diaries” that will soon air in Lifestyle Network. I have quite a few stories about this trip that I’ll be sharing in future entries.

Barcelona is one of those cities you can just lose yourself at while wandering through its streets. There are the must-see sites for visitors, those listed in all travel guides. But the true beauty of Barcelona is in what you discover while walking around. This is what happened to us in terms of food. We had a couple of pre-planned dining spots, but we left a lot of our meals to whatever came our way, wherever we were. Hope you like my list.

 

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Our hotel Hotel Silken was located just off of La Rambla, the main tree-lined promenade with kiosks that sell newspapers, flowers and souvenirs. We were within walking distance from La Boqueria and other great spots.

 

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When in Barcelona, must have churros at any random xurreria. Found this stall while walking around Placa de la Sagrada Familia, outside the church.

 

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Thank you for our guide, Fabio Bugna, for showing us some his favourite spots in his beautiful city.

 

 

FEAST - EUSKAL

 

We arrived in Barcelona on an afternoon flight and found ourselves famished by 5pm, too early for dinner. Euskal Taverna was a random discovery on our way to the Picasso Museum. They had a pintxos bar! Pintxos (or pinchos)  are little snacks served in bars common in the Basque country. They are like tapas, but pintxos are spiked with a skewer or toothpick on a piece of bread. They are served and billed individually. You may either order them or just pick them up in a buffet setting. You are then charged for each pintxos based on the number of toothpicks on your plate.

 

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Euskal Etxea Taverna

 

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The pintxos are presented over the bar. You just get what you want. This is what I love about Spanish dining. It’s so casual and social.

 

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For my first meal in Barcelona… of course, jamon iberico and tortilla de patata.

 

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Euskal has over 80 varieties of pintxos, depending on what is available and what’s fresh.

 

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Happy tummies. Our producer Dianne Sibal and director/videographer Carlo Lina.

EUSKAL TAVERNA, Placeta de Montcada, 1-3_08003. Tel +34 933102185

 

 

FEAST LA BOQUERIA

 

I can just imagine living in Barcelona and having La Boqueria market right there. I’d be picking up fresh food every single day. There would be very little cooking done, just tossing of all the fresh ingredients in hot olive oil and everything would taste so good. This is a place that is frequented by locals and tourists.

La Boqueria’s full name is Mercat de Sant Josep de la Boqueria. The earliest record of La Boqueria dates back to 1217. It went through many names and changes. It wasn’t til 1826 that the market was legally recognised. The construction of the permanent market structure started in 1840 under the direction of the architect Mas Vilà. The metal roof from the 1914 fish market still exists today. .

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My happy place in Barcelona.

 

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Seafood

 

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Fresh catch

 

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Being touristy in the market.

 

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Then I found what I was looking for.

 

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Acorn-fed Jamon Iberico. This one’s from Salamanca. The ones I bought were from Jabugo.

 

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I was so happy just tasting all the different legs!

 

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Seriously. This is my joy. I could never give up eating jamon.

 

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There’s my baby. I bought a big chunk of this and had it sliced and vacuum packed. Bellotas means acorn. This Iberian pig ate only acorns. It came from a farm in Jabugo. The ham was aged for 5 years. That’s the story of my jamon.

 

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My precious jamon iberico 5 jotas. I still have one pack in my fridge. Hmmm.

LA BOQUERIA, La Rambla, 91, 08001 Barcelona. Telephone +34 933 18 2584.

 

 

FEAST -ELQUIM

 

One of my unforgettable meals was in this amazing market stall at La Boqueria. El Quim does not take reservations. We took our chances and got there in the morning before the lunch rush started. El Quim started in 1987 with a three-metre long bar and just five stools. It now is one of the most famous eating spots in La Boqueria.

El Quim specializes in fried eggs, hence the egg emblem on the chefs’ jackets. They also have sandwiches, seafood and basically whatever fresh comes in to the market that day.

 

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You won’t miss El Quim when you are at La Boqueria. It has a choice spot in the middle of the market with a 16-metre wrap around counter and 18 stools.

 

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Chef Quim and his fellow chefs in the open kitchen.

 

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A must!!! Two fried eggs with baby squid. Yes fried eggs. The best I’ve ever had!!!

 

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Totally simple but oh so good – fried artichoke with a drizzle of sea salt.

 

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With a glass of cava, early morning.

 

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With the gracious and famous chef Quim.

EL QUIM DE LA BOQUERIA, Stalls 584-585-606-607-608-609, La Boqueria Market, Rambles. Telephone 93 301 98 10

 

 

FEAST ESCRIBA 5

 

Escriba is a pastry and chocolate shop with a lot of history and awards. We visited its second shop situated along La Rambla. The main confectionery showroom is at Gran Via. This shop along La Rambla was formerly Casa Figueras, makers of pasta and semolina. The corner shop shows beautiful Art Nouveau decor, with the founding date 1820, laid out in mosaic. The shop was refurbished in 1902 by stage designer Ros Guell who supervised some of the best craftsmen in the Art Nouveau movement.

 

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Escriba’s pretty art nouveau facade.

 

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The original corner mark of the building.

 

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Beautiful chocolate shop.

 

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We zeroed in on the xuixo, the sweet pastry beside the croissants.

 

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Creations of Chef Antoni Escriba, which have been winning awards since the 1950s.

 

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An image of the Virgin Mary guards the main shop.

 

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Dianne, Carlo and I with our xuixo purchase.

 

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If you don’t have time to sit and have coffee and sweets at Escriba, just drop by and get some xuixo, a pastry filled with crema catalana that is deep fried and covered with crystallized sugar. It was so good, I had to snap this selfie while walking down La Rambla with some crema in the corner of my mouth! Oops.

ESCRIBA, Rambla de les Flors 83, 08001. Telephone 93 301 6027

 

 

Feast formatgeria

 

One of the most charming places we went to was Formatgeria La Seu in Barri Gotic. This was highly recommended by our guide, Fabio. Formatgeria La Seu, a lovely cheese shop, is run by Katherine McLaughlin who personally picks the variety of cheeses from all over rural Spain. Her passion has brought her to some of the best cheese farms in Spain. At Formatgeria La Seu, you are guaranteed carefully selected cheeses, presented in optimum conditions.

We sat at the tasting room in the back, where we sampled a couple of palettes of cheese and a glass of vermouth.

 

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A lovely cheese shop in the narrow streets of Barri Gotic.

 

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The cheese at Formatgeria La Seu are stored and displayed in a temperature and humidity controlled cool-room, which one can enter, to view and sample.

 

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The tasting room at the back still has equipment for churning butter as this was one of the first butter-making factories in Barcelona.

 

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It was a very cold morning. This is Fabio and me trying to warm up with a glass of vermouth. It took me a while to peel off my trench coat.

 

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Vermouth was having something of a revival in Spain. It was an old-fashioned aperitif that was eventually replaced by beer or wine. But now, it is again in vogue in the Barcelona brunch set. People drink vermouth straight up before a meal or on Sundays after mass. Some say, vermouth’s resurgence has to do with the poor state of the economy. Vermouth has 15% alcohol by volume, offering the best value for your euro. The vermouth at Formatgeria La Seu was homemade, sourced though Katherine’s exploration of rural farms in the region.

 

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Each cheese in our palette came with a story about the farmer, the farm, the region. I was amazed.

 

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The backroom was kept as close to authentic as possible, with the old tiles and dairy-churning equipment.

 

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Wine and vermouth decanters in every shape.

 

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We really enjoyed this stop. I could have stayed longer. I’ll definitely be back. This is so Patrick’s thing.

FORMATGERIA LA SEU, Carrer Dagueria,16,08002, Barcelona. Telephone 93 412 65 48

 

 

FEAST - NACIONAL

In one of our walks home to our hotel, we stumbled upon El Nacional. At the time, it was just newly opened. El Nacional is located in a huge warehouse-like structure that dates back to 1889, the height of the industrial revolution in Barcelona. It used to house a cafe, a theatre, a fabric dye factory, a car dealer’s shop before the Spanish Civil War. Then it became a garage.

The building of El Nacional has now been converted into this beautiful dining hot spot with six different food specializations that reflect various recipes from the around the Iberian Peninsula. Loved the interiors!!! We didn’t get to try anything here, so feel free to let me know in the comments section how the food was. I just wanted to show photos of the stunning space.

 

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Narrow path that leads to El Nacional

 

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The cocktail bar.

 

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The oyster bar.

 

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La Llotja, specializing in fresh seafood.

 

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There is a mini seafood market where diners can choose their catch of the day and request for it to be cooked.

EL NACIONAL, Passeig de Gràcia, 24 Bis 08007. Telephone +(34) 93 518 5053.

 

 

FEAST - STOP MOS

Stop & Mos was  random find while shopping at the Mercat dels Encants, one of the oldest markets in Europe, dating back to the fourteenth century. After going through stalls of peddlers in the antique market (I will share with you my finds later), we went up to the mezzanine and looked for a place to eat.

Stop & Mos is one of those market stalls that caters to people on the go. Their logo says “natural take away food.” So this is not your typical fast food joint. We found a picnic table and seats, where we ate our food in take out containers outdoors. It was December and it was cold. Everything we ordered was so good.

 

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Mercat dels Encants.

 

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There was a fantastic view of Torre Agbar from the market.

 

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Me and Fabio ordering our tapas and pintxos.

 

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The chef himself was taking our order while preparing our food.

 

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We had tortilla, tapas, croquettas, sardines and these amazing fried peppers. I could have eaten the whole dish.

 

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Layers of aubergine with goat cheese, tomatoes and olive oil.

 

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And my favourite Spanish comfort food, tortilla de patatas.

STOP & MOS, Castillejos 158, Fira Bellcaire Mercat dels encants, Barcelona.

 

 

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Casa de Tapas is an interesting concept restaurant that put together award-winning, Michelin-starred dishes from other Barcelona restaurants and chefs, all under one roof. It’s like being able to have a sampler of all the best dishes at one time. This was our only scheduled meal in Barcelona where we actually had reservations. Excellent.

 

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We started with bruschetta using fresh tomatoes and garlic and a bottle of award-winning olive oil from Tickets.

 

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Casa de Tapes staff demonstrated how to rub fresh garlic and tomato on toasted bread. Then we drizzled extra virgin olive oil and sprinkled salt and pepper on our toasts. Delicious.

 

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Salad with burrata.

 

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Steamed tomatoes. So simple yet so out of this world amazing. What’s in their potatoes in Barcelona?

 

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Beef stew that just fell off the bone.

 

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Dani Garcia’s Burguerbull, with two Michelin stars. Oxtail burger, beef, arugula, havarti, cheese and Dani’s magical mayonnaise.

 

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Chocolate cake

 

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Russian roulette chocolate by Escriba. One of these chocolates is filled with pepper. Dianne was the lucky one.

 

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A memorable farewell dinner with new friends Fabio, Dianne and Carlo.

CASA DE TAPAS CANOTA, Calle Lleida 7, Barcelona. Telephone +(34) 93 3259171.

 

 

Sfera

 

 

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This season saw the opening of many foreign fashion brands here in Manila. It is a really exciting time for shoppers, but also a bit nerve-wracking for local retailers. I say all this competition is healthy for our economy. Plus for the many travellers who shop abroad, now you can focus on doing other things that travellers do like eat, see historical/architectural sites, experience local culture. I feel there will be less “need” for me to shop when I travel because almost everything is here now!

A few weeks ago, I attended the launch of Sfera. Its first branch is located at the second floor of SM Makati. Sfera is a Spanish brand that carries current fashion for women, men, and children. I really liked the personality of the brand. Lots of comfortable and current styles, but not exactly too trendy. I found a lot of relaxed clothing that’s perfect for casual days. But also discovered some interesting printed outfits and tailored items. The good news is – prices are very affordable. They had dresses as low as P1,200. On an average, each item I bought didn’t go over P2,000. I think I found my new favourite fast-fashion retailer.

 

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I almost got this grey sweatshirt but realized that I would need to actually make this blog come alive again. It’s kind of been in a long slumber. Haha. So sorry for being lackadaisical about updating my blog.

 

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These printed long sleeve shirt dresses are perfect for lazy weekends, while polished enough for easy meetings.

 

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I wore that red dress during a ribbon cutting ceremony at Manila FAME.

 

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I loved their collection of intimates. I got a couple of these stretchy lace-lined camisoles.

 

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Interesting details

 

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The accessories were arranged by themes. This beaded clutch had that nice Navajo pattern.

 

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Tropical

 

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The kids clothing are really “cool” – this, according to Sophia and Lily. And really friendly on the pocket. So affordable.

 

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See what I mean?

 

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I don’t know what’s happening, but my girls are really really into sweatshirts these days. They want to wear sweats every day.

 

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Cute tween fashion

 

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They even have infant wear

 

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With the merchandising team of Sfera. I love how no one wears socks in a certain demographic these days.

 

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With Jenni Epperson, Patti Filart and Rica Bonifacio.

 

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Lately all I’ve been wearing is Sfera. Good for non-occasion days and easy to spiff up for dressier parties.

 

Follow Sfera Philippines on Instagram at @sferaPH

 

 

Photo Diary, My UNICEF visit to Tacloban

 

 

I went on a UNICEF site visit to Tacloban a couple of weeks ago. As with every UNICEF trip I’ve taken in the past, I was extremely moved. It has been nine months since this strongest storm to ever hit landfall devastated eastern Visayas. Driving through Tacloban and parts of Palo, Leyte, you can still see many remnants of the physical damage. It’s still quite overwhelming. But in this trip, I also saw a lot of hope.

It was good to see some smiles again. But ask any individual who lived through Haiyan/Yolanda, “How are you doing?/Kamusta ka na?” and tears well up in their eyes. The wounds are deep. Any hint of rain or strong winds brings them back to that fateful day last November 8th. I didn’t want anyone to have to relive their harrowing ordeal. Almost everyone gathered to see me at my visit lost someone they loved during the storm. Instead I wanted to see what life is like presently for those who were affected.

Over 14.1 million people were affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Of those, 5.9 million were children. UNICEF continues to provide life-saving and recovery assistance for children affected by Typhoon Haiyan. There’s still a lot of work that needs to be done.

Here’s my photo diary of my visit to Tacloban and Palo,Leyte.

 

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Some of the most incredible scenes were of these huge ships that ran aground in Tacloban during Haiyan. In Barangay Anibong alone, there were five ships.

 

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This barangay in Anibong has been declared a “no dwelling zone.” But despite that, people have rebuilt their houses near the water.

 

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Like the sign says, this is still a “danger zone.”

 

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This ship went inland the furthest. It actually hit the high way.

 

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Here’s the other end of that ship that went furthest inland. When my friends saw my photos, one of them asked why these boats haven’t been pulled back into shore yet. She felt frustrated like no one was doing anything. But I have to tell you that these are huge ships. And they are so far inland. Nothing can pull these back to the water.

 

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So instead of being pulled away, some of the ships were being sliced up into pieces by the ship owners.

 

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The irony. A sticker saying “Think Safety” was plastered on this cargo container. It was one of the hundreds of containers from the port that washed ashore. It now serves as foundation for this house that’s not even supposed to be there.

 

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The barangay captain telling me about their dilemma.

 

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Rosario, the Barangay Captain in Anibong.

 

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With the Chief of Field Office Maulid Warfa at the UNICEF office in Tacloban. Some of the UNICEF staff have been on site since the typhoon struck last November 8th 2013. Whenever I visit sites with UNICEF I am not only touched by the stories of the local people but also of the professionals who have devoted their life doing humanitarian work. These are the people who respond to emergencies around the world.

 

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We went to Barayong Elementary school in Palo, Leyte. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014

 

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The acting-principal of Barayong Elementary School showing me and Cromwell Bacareza, OIC of UNICEF WASH Team some of the physical improvements in the school, like a new roof. This school was severely affected by Haiyan/Yolanda. It is located on a mountain. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014

 

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It was heartwarming to see kids back in school. To date, UNICEF has provided learning materials and supplies for over 500,000 pre-school and school-aged children (3 to 17 years) across Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda-affected areas.

 

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I loved seeing smiles back in their faces.

 

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That afternoon, the grade 4 and 5 kids were writing letters to their pen pals from Australia.

 

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This is such a great activity.

 

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Erwin Dolina, teacher-in-charge and acting-principal of Barayong Elementary School and his makeshift office.

 

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His laptop is broken so he is using a separate monitor hooked up to the laptop’s keyboard. Mr. Dolina said the school is understaffed. They only have 4 teachers for the entire school. So teachers double-up with classes. He has to do administrative work in addition to teaching and correcting papers. He also has to check the school on weekends because there are no doors or locks to protect their supplies.

 

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There is a deep well at the back of the school. In order to ensure safety, UNICEF installed pumps and pipes to bring in water nearer to the school. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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OIC of UNICEF’s WASH Program (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) Cromwell Bacareza shows me that water from the well is stored in a tank which is connected to these pipes. This is a makeshift lavatory where kids can wash their hands. It’s known as tippy tap. UNICEF supports schools affected by Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda by providing water, sanitation & hygiene facilities and supplies to ensure that children stay healthy, which helps them stay in school. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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The tippy tap is made of modest material. For a low cost, we can ensure that children have access to clean water. UNICEF also provided schools with soap. It is very important for children to wash their hands with soap and water. This needs to be instilled in them at a young age so that we can be healthy and germ-free. Because of the tippy tap, hand-washing becomes a social activity. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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UNICEF also installed safe and clean temporary toilets in every classroom. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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In another town called Abucay, I visited the temporary bunkhouses. This community had an amazing “Child-Friendly Space” set up by UNICEF. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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Inside the tent. A child plays…

 

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I kept falling in love with the babies. Cutie pie. Sigh.

 

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This child-friendly space in Abucay Bunkhouse in Tacloban is a place where young children can play, sing and dance under the guidance of city social welfare workers and volunteers.

 

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To date, more than 40,000 children across Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda-affected areas have accessed psychosocial support at child-friendly spaces provided by UNICEF.

 

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We took a walk around the Abucay temporary bunkhouses. One of the fathers was tending to his container garden. I love that there is a consciousness to grow food. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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With the bunkhouse manager Joseph dela Pena. The bunkhouse is one of the temporary housing programs provided by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD). It houses over 180 families with provision to water and sanitation facilities and a UNICEF child-friendly space tent.

 

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I loved seeing these ornaments decorating the alleys. These were made by the community.

 

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Before entering any house, I took my shoes off.

 

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This mother has five children. Except for the baby, they are all back in school. Her eyes welled up with tears when she recalled their experience when Haiyan/Yolanda hit. She said she and her husband hung on to all their kids and climbed the ceiling of a structure. They stayed there all day. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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A pretty young mom shares with me her experience breastfeeding her baby.

 

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I’m always happy to see a breastfeeding mom in any situation. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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I also visited a UNICEF-supported Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) counselling in Barangay 64, Tacloban City. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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This is a weekly program where mothers can get together and have counselling about nutrition, breastfeeding and maternal health issues. There is a child-friendly play space for toddlers.

 

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Another cutie pie.

 

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UNICEF Chief of Tacloban Field office Maulid Warfa and I spent some time playing with children while their mothers attend a UNICEF-supported Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) counselling in the adjacent room in Barangay 64, Tacloban City. IYCF counselling sessions ensure that parents and caregivers breastfeed and give proper nutritious food to their children to keep them healthy. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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City health workers in Sagkahan District Health Centre in Tacloban show me the vaccine refrigerator. UNICEF is providing vaccines, cold chain equipment, and vaccine management training for health personnel across Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda-affected areas. Photo by UNICEF/Joey Reyna 2014.

 

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UNICEF is supporting the Department of Health (Philippines)’s National Immunization Campaign this September, which aims to protect 13 million children under 5 against polio, measles and rubella.

 

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It was good to see mothers bringing in their babies to get regular medical checks at the Sagkahan District Health Centre in Tacloban City. Cute baby alert again.

 

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I took the opportunity to film a short video to help fundraise for UNICEF. For information on how to donate, click here.

 

For information on UNICEF’s programs in the Philippines, visit www.unicef.ph and like Unicef Philippines in Facebook. To know about my work with UNICEF as Special Advocate for Children, click here.

 

New developments in Ilocos Norte

 

 

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Chapel of La Virgen Milagrosa in Badoc, Ilocos Norte

 

Our Ilocos Norte stories continue. We spent four days and three nights in Paoay but saw a lot of the province using a serviced van. A must-see is the Chapel of La Virgen Milagrosa in Badoc, the southernmost municipality along the coast of Ilocos Norte. The chapel is newly built and has just been consecrated last December 2013. It is one of the most charming chapels I’d seen. It’s situated along the beach of a lovely little cove.

 

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The chapel is built using indigenous materials. It was built by the Provincial government under the leadership of Imee Marcos.

 

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The altar is made of sea shells. It is believed that the miraculous statue of La Virgen Milagrosa was wound floating at sea in the 1600’s and only the residents of Badoc could carry the weight of the statue back to shore.

 

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We had lunch and spent the afternoon at Sitio Remedios in Currimao.

 

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It’s a beautiful seaside resort.

 

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There is a lovely little chapel dedicated to St Michael.

 

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It is so quaint

 

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It’s seen many weddings.

 

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There are lovely old houses…

 

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These houses were transferred to the site from other locations in the country.

 

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Here the houses are preserved and restored.

 

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And now anyone can rent a house and stay there as a guest.

 

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Lily found her spot.

 

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And so did Soph.

 

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Every meal we had included bagnet. Seriously. Yum. Here’s Sitio Remedios’ bagnet and pakbet.

 

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Tomato and onion salad

 

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Seaweed

 

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Catch of the day

 

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Another look at the buttresses of this lovely little chapel. I’d love to stay in Sitio Remedios next time I visit Ilocos Norte. It’s so charming.

 

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The Paoay church (St. Augustine) at dusk.

 

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The moon

 

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My shadow selfie

 

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Buttresses

 

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It’s amazing, especially with the beautiful lighting

 

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Right beside the St Augustine church is Paseo de Paoay, a brand new two-storey building commissioned by the Provincial Government of Ilocos Norte.

 

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The idea is to bring back the idea of a town plaza where church, commerce and culture can co-exist and attract a lot of tourists and locals. The building was designed by Palafox Associates who also developed the Metro Ilocos Norte Tourism Master Plan. All these — the Himala Concert, Leeroy New’s installation, the new La Virgen Milagrosa Chapel, the Paoay plaza including this Paseo de Paoay — are all part of that grand plan to make Ilocos Norte a dynamic and attractive destination for tourists and investors.

 

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The building has a neo-colonial features. Governor Imee Marcos’ vision is to have new developments conform to the architectural character of Ilocos Norte’s past. The province’s new master plan actually has specific building restrictions and guidelines such as arches, cement tiles and other neo-colonial elements.

 

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Paseo de Paoay was newly inaugurated just days before we arrived. There are a few restaurants open but more are still expected to open. The building is still in its finishing touches.

 

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The courtyard, still under construction.

 

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This was my first time to have Batac empanada and it has changed my life!

 

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All these years people were raving about Vigan empanada and I was always like, ok ya but… Then I tried Batac and wow, it blew my mind.

 

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Ok so look beyond all that unhealthy oil.

 

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The crispiest empanada I’ve ever had. And like Vigan empanada, Batac empanada also has egg. But basically the other ingredients are different – papaya, longganisa and other secrets. This was at Glomy’s in Batac.

 

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I must say this made me so giddy. Our host uses DAPHNE® Home Scents from Bench. They were all over the guest house.

 

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Stella in Batac

 

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OOTD time. That dress I wore at Himala Sa Buhangin concert is one of my favourites. I bought it in Mist in Bali last February.

 

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Sunset was quite spectacular

 

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Great memories were once again made…

 

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Thank you Ilocos Norte.

 

For information on Ilocos Norte Tourism check out www.tourismilocosnorte.com. Part One of my Ilocos Norte Diaries here and Part Two here. Next, more of Ilocos Norte, it’s museums and natural wonders, here.

 

 

Massimo Bonini

 

 

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Sabrina and Massimo Bonini

 

I was in shoe heaven the other week. I had the pleasure of hosting the official opening of Massimo Bonini at Shangri-La Plaza’s East Wing. The beautiful luxury shop has been open since November 2013. This was an occasion to celebrate the spring/summer 2014 collection with the founders Massimo and Sabrina Bonini in attendance.

The Massimo Bonini multi-brand luxury showroom was founded in the late 80’s at the Via Montenapoleone in Italy. It started as a melting pot of Italian and international brands of shoes and accessories for men and women. Think mecca of luxury shoes and bags now in 80 countries.

The Massimo Bonini showroom at Shangri-La East Wing carries 27 brands which include: Gianvito Rossi, Bruno Bordese, Etro, Giambattista Valli, Henderson, Kalliste, McQ, Missoni, MSGM, Roberto Cavalli, Thomas Blakk, and Versace.

 

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With the representative of Shangri-La Plaza, Edwin Ngo, the Boninis and Italian Ambasador.

 

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Issa Litton, Tessa Valdes, Karen Jimeno, Rica Peralejo, Tintin Bersola and Angel Jacob

 

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Maggie Wilson-Consunji, Karen Jimeno and Angel Jacob

 

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Same people mentioned above plus Julius and Tintin Babao and Alice Dixon.

 

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The part we all loved… shopping.

 

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I was so attracted to this pair of Sebastian flats! They came home with me.

 

Here it is…
Sebastian

 

Missoni2

 

Kartell2

 

Design Inverso4

 

Giambattista Valli

 

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Edwin Ngo, President of 128 Dream Fountain Corp which brought in Massimo Bonini.

 

Massimo Bonini is located at the 2/3 Mid-level Shangri-La Plaza East Wing. Follow them on Instagram @massimoboniniph.